Students – ACCE 1 – Cohort 5

Jake Anderson

jaa563@york.ac.uk

University of York

Lead Supervisor: Prof Jane Hill

Project Title: Tropical rainforests in human-modified landscapes: biodiversity, forest regeneration and carbon storage at forest edges

Research Interests: My research examines the effects of rainforest fragmentation on tree communities in tropical agricultural landscapes. I am using a combination of field data and remotely-sensed satellite data to study changes in tree community composition and above-ground carbon stocks, in forest edges bordering oil palm plantations in Southeast Asia. This research will help us to determine the environmental impacts of oil palm expansion, and will inform the management of more sustainable oil palm landscapes into the future.

Sophie Bennett

sobenn@ceh.ac.uk

University of Liverpool/Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH)

Lead Supervisor: Dr Francis Daunt

Research Interests: Sophie is researching the year-round population ecology and behaviour of seabirds. Her work focuses on understanding the drivers of individual variation in behaviour and how this scales up to population-level change through investigating nest site occupancy and quality, non-breeding nest site attendance, and the distribution and energetics of common guillemots.

Alexandra Burkitt

ab1700@york.ac.uk

University of York

Alexander Campbell Ball

ACBall1@sheffield.ac.uk   

University of Sheffield

Lead Supervisor: Prof Charles Wellman

Emma Cartledge

emma.cartledge@liverpool.ac.uk

University of Liverpool

Lead Supervisor: Prof Paula Stockley

Research Interests: I am interested in conservation ecology and genetics, particularly how we can minimise anthropogenic effects and recover populations of key species and biodiversity as a whole. My PhD research is focused on hazel dormouse conservation in the UK. I am studying the factors which may affect long-term reintroduction success, as well as working on the development of low disturbance monitoring techniques.

Twitter: @EL_Cartledge

CASE partner: Cheshire Wildlife Trust (https://www.cheshirewildlifetrust.org.uk/)

Helen Davison

hlhdavi5@liverpool.ac.uk

University of Liverpool

Lead Supervisor: Prof Greg Hurst

George Day

gwd500@york.ac.uk

University of York

Lead Supervisor: Dr Kathryn Arnold

Research Interests: I’m researching symbiosis in freshwater invertebrates.

James Duckworth

James.Duckworth@liverpool.ac.uk  

University of Liverpool

Lead Supervisor: Dr Jon Green

Research Interests: Red-throated Divers (RTD) have been identified in many studies as being extremely vulnerable to displacement by wind farms. However, there is still uncertainty about the implications of displacement and the ability of RTDs to adapt to additional stressors during their non-breeding season. I aim to use Bio-logging techniques to monitor RTD throughout their annual cycle to assess the energetic consequences of displacement. The understudied ecology of RTD also opens up many other avenues for novel results throughout the project.

I am based at University of Liverpool, with the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) as my case partner. My field sites are: Southern Finland, Orkney, Shetland and Iceland.

Research group website – https://seguliverpool.wixsite.com/home/james-duckworth

Catherine Finlayson

cfinlayson1@sheffield.ac.uk

University of Sheffield

Lead Supervisor: Prof Rob Freckleton

Project Title: Developing effective liana removal practices to restore degraded tropical forests

Research Interests: My research interests are the conservation and restoration of tropical forests. My PhD researches the restoration potential of removing lianas (woody climbing plants) from degraded tropical forests. I aim to develop a less damaging liana removal method via a large fieldwork experiment at my field site in Sabah, Borneo. I will also use satellite data to assess the impact this experiment on forest structure and use meta-analytic techniques to assess whether liana removal enhances tree growth and aboveground carbon sequestration across the tropics. Ultimately, I hope to refine liana removal so that it wholly restores degraded rainforest and recommend when and where the treatment can be applied most effectively.

Twitter: @cfinlayson_sci

Research group – http://www.edwardslab.group.shef.ac.uk/catherine-finlayson/

Katherine Hearn

KHearn1@sheffield.ac.uk

University of Sheffield

Lead Supervisor: Prof Roger Butlin

Poppy Jeffries

PMJeffries1@sheffield.ac.uk

University of Sheffield

Lead Supervisor: Dr Jonathan Potts

Michael Lawson

mrml500@york.ac.uk

University of York

Lead Supervisor: Dr Kanchon Dasmahapatra

Amy Lewis

ALLewis2@sheffield.ac.uk

University of Sheffield

Lead Supervisor: Prof David Beerling

Project Title: Enhancing the soil carbon sink: Towards characterising and quantifying new stabilisation methods

Research Interests: Researching mineral-organic matter interactions in basalt-amended soils. The project aims to quantify changes in the soil organic carbon sink associated with basalt amendment which could provide an additional carbon capture pathway and increase soil quality.
Research interests include experimental geochemistry, kinetic-rate determination, mineralogy, geochemical techniques (e.g. X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy) and soil processes.

Thomas Lewis

TCLewis1@sheffield.ac.uk

University of Sheffield

Lead Supervisor: Dr Dylan Childs

Victoria Lloyd

VJLloyd1@sheffield.ac.uk

University of Sheffield

Lead Supervisor: Dr Nicola Nadeau

Project Title: The evolutionary development of butterfly structural colour

Research Interests: I am interested in the evolutionary development of structural colour in tropical butterflies.

Lucy McMahon

lm1536@york.ac.uk

University of York

Lead Supervisor: Prof Roland Gehrels

Research Interests: I am a marine scientist with broad interests in coastal wetlands, marine habitat restoration, and nature-based solutions. My PhD research investigates blue carbon [the carbon captured and stored by marine and coastal ecosystems] in salt marshes. I am interested in gaining a deeper understanding of the major drivers of spatial and temporal variation in blue carbon accumulation rates and stocks, which in turn I hope can inform effective coastal management for climate change mitigation.

Twitter: @_LucyMcMahon

Instagram (for outreach): @ocean_luce

Department project page: https://www.york.ac.uk/environment/our-staff/lucy-mcmahon/

Jake Pepper

JPepper3@sheffield.ac.uk

University of Sheffield

Lead Supervisor: Prof Jon Slate

Francesca Quell

Fgquell1@sheffield.ac.uk

University of Sheffield

Lead Supervisor: Dr Tom Webb

Research Interests: My research involves investigating the macroecology of biological traits in marine environments. I focus specifically on attempting to determine the biological traits that discriminate between native and non-indigenous marine invertebrates and whether biological and life history traits can be used to predict the invasive potential of species. Another aspect of my research focuses on investigating whether invasive and imperilled molluscs (gastropods and bivalves) occur at opposite ends of the life history continuum.

Lauren Rawlins

ldr505@york.ac.uk

University of York

Lead Supervisor: Dr David Rippin

Project Title: The quantification of changes in supraglacial conditions on the Greenland Ice Sheet and implications for surface drainage development  

Research Interests: My main interests include examining the impacts of contemporary climate change on glaciated environments, glacial geomorphology, remote sensing and UAV photogrammetry. My PhD thesis will investigate the seasonal and annual evolution of surface meltwater (supraglacial) channels on the Greenland Ice Sheet via the use of remote sensing techniques and field-based observations. My Masters thesis investigated glacioseismic signals from seasonal mass balance changes at Vatnajokull, Iceland.

Kelly Ross

kellyr@liverpool.ac.uk

University of Liverpool

Lead Supervisor: Dr Michael Berenbrink

Research Interests: My current research concentrates on the evolutionary physiology of tissue oxygenation in mammals. Despite important commonalities, more than one hundred years of study have revealed important variations in how mammals deliver O2 to their tissues, which are still incompletely understood and actively researched. I aim to expand our knowledge of mammalian respiratory physiology, test conventional assumption and identify novel drivers that are responsible for the variation in the capacity and mechanisms of tissue oxygenation.

Donald Scott

DScott7@sheffield.ac.uk

University of Sheffield

Lead Supervisor: Prof Rob Freckleton

Tom Travers

T.Travers@liverpool.ac.uk

University of Liverpool

Lead Supervisor: Dr Jenny Hodgson

Research Interests: My interests lie in conservation practice and policy surrounding anthropogenic climate change. The spatial distribution of species is dynamic, and will likely become more so as our climate continues to change. Therefore, modern conservation planners need to consider not only where species are, but where they will eventually end up, and how they are likely to get there. My research uses mathematics based in electronics to model landscape connectivity, and investigate how species may use habitat as they shift their ranges in reaction to our changing climate. By doing so, I hope to highlight how these techniques could be incorporated into our conservation planning procedures, allowing actions taken today to be beneficial in the long-term.

Katey Valentine

klv501@york.ac.uk

University of York

Lead Supervisor: Dr Karen Thorpe

Joel Woon

j.woon@liverpool.ac.uk

University of Liverpool

Lead Supervisor: Prof Kate Parr

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